A Song For Milly Michaelson

Posted on April 15, 2008

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every now and again, a song enters through my ears and makes a slow, smoldering course through my body, heart, and mind. I’m beginning to embrace more and more the connection between the metaphysical and the physical, the spiritual and the corporeal, and some songs serve as tangible reminders of such a concept.

Thrice releases a new dual-EP album tomorrow, Tuesday, April 15. one particular song off the “Air” EP has quickly established itself as one of the most brilliant and beautiful songs I’ve ever encountered. “A Song for Milly Michaelson,” despite its repetitive guitar and lack of overtly dynamic instrumentation, is captivating, far more engaging than nearly any song I have heard. both title and lyrics are based on the movie “The Boy Who Could Fly”:

After the suicide of her terminally-ill father, fourteen year old Amelia “Milly” Michaelson loses interest in almost everything around her. But before long, she becomes friends with Eric Gibb, a young autistic neighbor who had lost both of his parents to a plane crash. Together, Eric and Milly find ways to cope with the loss and the pain, as they escape to far away places.

the lyrics take the movie’s premise, make use of every emotional avenue, and dig into any corner where affect may lie. it’s a song that I’m compelled to share for its genius, if not for its breathtaking beauty and structure.

Well you know I hardly speak.
When I do it’s just for you.
I haven’t said a word in weeks
‘Cause they’ve been keeping me from you.

There’s a way where there’s a will.
You know I got no need for stairs.
Step out on the window sill,
Fall with me into the air.

So, here we go.
Hold on tight and don’t let go.
I won’t ever let you fall.
I love the night.
Flying o’er these city lights.
But I love you most of all.

Well there’s something you should know.
Girl you should have died that day.
You fell reaching for the rose
Baby I was there to save you.

just something I couldn’t keep to myself.

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Posted in: music, reviews